The Best Job Sites for 2017

If you’ve worked with me to write your new resume, you know I’ll ask you to send me a few job ads at the outset of our engagement to help inform the process of drafting your new resume. I use these job ads to help me understand your goals, of course, but I’m also using them to identify keywords that will help your resume rank with applicant tracking systems (ATS) as well as to help frame your experience in a way that positions you for the type of job you want next. Many resumes suffer from being an overly-detailed, obituary-style reporting of everything you’ve ever done, professionally speaking. Instead, your resume should be a relatively short, very strong persuasive argument about what you’re positioned to do next. To write a great resume, we rely heavily on job ads that represent your desired next step.

So where do you find these job ads? For years, I have recommended Indeed.com and linkedin.com/jobs/. In the last couple of years, Glassdoor.com has become an increasingly fantastic resource for job seekers and my new favorite website to share with my clients. That’s why I was excited to read that Reviews.com recently released its “Best Job Sites for 2017” report.

Reviews.com recognizes my three favorite job search sites for 2017:

  • Glassdoor.com – Best Overall
  • Indeed.com – Most Comprehensive
  • LinkedIn.com – Best for Networking

Here’s a recap, excerpted from the review:

The best place for you to start looking for a job is Glassdoor. In our tests, it had the most new jobs posted every day. It complements that freshness with an in-depth look at the companies posting them. These eye-catching multimedia company profiles are balanced with anonymous feedback from current and former employees on culture, salary, and the CEO — there are even charts to show how a company’s rating has changed over time. Glassdoor gives you both the info you need to find job opportunities and the context to see if it’s a good fit for you too.

When it comes to pure coverage, though, Indeed is the heavy hitter. Its aggregation algorithms were unparalleled in our test, meaning there’s a better chance that jobs posted on other random job boards, sites, and companies across the web will show up here. Plus, it’s one of the only sites from our top picks that lets employers post openings for free, making it a first stop for lots of companies. It’s pretty bare-bones, though, and because it’s such a good aggregator, you often get ping-ponged between job sites, instead of the actual job posting, which leads to a less-than-stellar user experience.

We can’t not mention LinkedIn. When it comes to job posting, it’s middle of the pack, especially compared to Glassdoor and Indeed. But it’s such a powerful working tool we’d be remiss not to recommend it. LinkedIn’s most powerful feature: It shows job seekers networking pathways to help score introductions, the first step to getting an internal referral. Read the full article here.

Mir Garvy

Author: Mir Garvy

I’ve written resumes for 2,000+ job seekers just like you—and helped my clients land jobs with companies like Amazon, SAS, Google, Duke University, Travelocity, Cisco Systems, GlaxoSmithKline, Expedia, and IBM.